18 Reasons Why Air Lift Pumps Will Revolutionise Aquaponics.

 

18 reasons why air lift pumps make so much sense and why you should seriously consider this methodology for your Aquaponics system. (Yes your home Aquaponics system will benefit as well)
Here is the list.

1. No more submersible pumps.
2. Lower install cost.
3. No need for additional Earth Leakage Safety cut out switch. (GFI outlet) Higher safety threshold.
4. So simple even school children can do the install.
5. Virtually maintenance free.
6. No moving parts. K.I.S.S.
7. Easily pump solids.
8. Stock separation.
9. Increase water lift.
10. Save electrical energy cost.
11. Go way beyond common lift provided by a regular submersible.
12. Pump higher than ever before.
13. Turbo drive your water pump.
14. Turbo drive aeration.
15. Verticals easily supplied, such as Zip Grow towers or Greenlife Pocket towers. (this feature alone is amazing)
16. Repair and replacement costs greatly reduced.
17. Very long service life.
18. Never run dry.

There is a few more reasons that will be expanded on in our one day Air Lift seminar with Glenn Martinez  Brisbane Friday 6th March.
Glenn will show you how to make it work, has plan books showing exactly how to do it at your place.   Glenn's air pumps will revolutionise Commercial Aquaponics.

PS.....Class was run on Friday 6th March and was just fantastic. WE have filmed the event and will soon post the edited film for our Gold Members to see.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Leave a Reply, I love to hear from you.

41 thoughts on “18 Reasons Why Air Lift Pumps Will Revolutionise Aquaponics.

  1. I live in the UK and would like to learn about these pumps as I am just starting to build my system, will you be publishing details in another format for non-Aussies?

    • Hi Mick, We are developing and on-line video based Master Class course so perhaps that will be good for you. Keep an eye on the newsletters or put your name down to be informed on progress. You will see a link in the newsletter about that.
      Regards

      • I am in the same boat as Mick. Will you please put my name down to be informed on the on-line video Master Class course particularly about the airlift pump?

        C. T.

        • Hi CT, Good to hear from you.
          Please go here and register your interest.
          It is a registration to be kept informed as the classes become available. It is up to you if you choose to enrol in the classes or not when the time comes.
          You will be sent an email asking you to confirm your email address. This is to limit spam in the system.

          http://www.aquaponicscourses.net.au/discover

          Regards
          Murray

          • DVD is a good suggestion for persons unable to travel so far to Australia to attend a one-day event. Making a video recording is easy but editing the unwanted parts takes time. I am willing to accept unedited version to save your time. Thank you for bringing up the subject of air-lift pump. I have already burned out a few pumps due to negligence in cleaning the filter. The whole aquaponics community will appreciate that.

          • Hi CT, The course will be delivered on-line. We still have a lot of filming to do but we are getting there.

    • Hi Ranga,
      Really low cost, that is so true. Glad you noticed that. Glenn Martinez has really perfected the methodology and is one of the very few true innovators in the world of Aquaponics.

        • Hi Ranga, Well, where do I start listing the cost of running such events. We do not make anything out of it unless we get at least 10 to attend and then it is still questionable if we have actually broken even.
          Thanks for your comment anyway. Everyone without exception who attends any of our courses say it is worth the money and much more. So, why don’t you book in and get the great knowledge and value.
          Regards
          Murray

  2. Hi Murray,

    I’m interested in the workshop but not sure I can make it at this stage. What time are you starting in the morning? Alternatively maybe the on-line Master Class would work for me too.

    Thanks,

    Simon

    • Hi Simon,
      Sunday session might suit you. See the bottom of the page of the booking button for the sunday session.
      8:30 registration for 9:00 start
      Regards
      Murray

      • Thanks, I have plans now for Sunday so have booked online for the Friday workshop. I’m in Lismore but may drive up and camp Thursday night at Tweed so I’m a bit closer.

        See you Friday morning!

        Cheers,

        Simon

        • That’s good Simon. Not enough takers for the Sunday one as yet so it may not go ahead if we do not get at least 10 bookings. Friday is fine. Look forward to seeing you here.

  3. Air lift pumps…..Colle and Phyllis Davis from Portable Farms.com, Aquaponic systems, have been using air lift pump systems for over 40 years. They even have a patent on the pump system, and in there Aquaponic University Course System explain the system……Didn’t know if you knew or not.

    • Well, thanks for commenting. I am always amused by the 40-year claim. I am sure that very soon it may reach 50 years. Many people think that longevity is a proof of authenticity. He actually has a patent pending last time I checked. Anyway, good on them, and thanks for the info. I was only a few minutes ago watching a YouTube clip by one of my students who first attended my training class 6 years ago in Florida. He says he has been doing AP for 10 years. Amazing. By the time he has been doing it for 12 years he will be able to claim 20.
      Anyway, may their fish taste good and their veggies grow rapidly.

      • i don’t know about their real experiences, but they have a high price for everything, the “junior” course cost 700 usd, and the “full” cost 2500 usd. Not sure what are the results after those courses, but i’m sure they have a very good business going there.

        • Well, good luck to them I guess. Anyway, Glen Martinez really knows his stuff and has actually completed dozens of projects installing air lift pumps. So, maybe when we are over your way next you might like to come along.

          Regards
          Murray

      • Murray, the “Lower 48” is the United States mainland. It excludes Alaska and Hawaii.. Of course Texas is included in that. I had fun in your class a couple of years ago in Spring, Texas.

        • Thanks Mark,
          Still not up with all the US expressions. Thanks for that info. Going back to Spring Texas in May/June. Still to fix the dates.

          Good to hear from you.

          Regards

    • Hi Scott,
      I go to Perth twice a year. I was there in September so maybe in the next few months we can go back and run a one day training. Is that what you had in mind?

      Regards

    • Yes, we wre working on that. Takes ages to put that kind of thing together between the normal daily activities…..but, yes working on it for sure.

  4. Murry I remember years ago when I first start looking into this aquaponics and from memory you where one of the only people I remember doing it, great to see how well it’s turned out for you and to see how well you take peoples little jabs at you here. Never miss a beat keep it up mate.

    • Thanks for your kind words Benjamin. Yes, we are still here and Aquaponics is getting stronger and stronger. Aquaponics is now seen to be the wonderful food production system that it is.

  5. For over 10 years I have calculated the energy efficiency of every airlift pump of which the 3 important data: (energy input driving the air pump, head and volume) were presented,
    assuming the honesty of the manufacturer that these data occur at the same moment,
    and are measured (not guessed)

    here are the results for the Glenn Martinez airlift pumps:

    head in m flow@head flow@head rating head in kg/cm² pump effect efficiency

    1,219 m 9,5 l/min 568 l/hr 40 watt-hr 0,122 kg/cm² 2 watt-hr 4,81%
    1,219 m 12,6 l/min 757 l/hr 40 watt-hr 0,122 kg/cm² 3 watt-hr 6,41%
    0,610 m 9,5 l/min 568 l/hr 25 watt-hr 0,061 kg/cm² 1 watt-hr 3,85%
    0,610 m 18,9 l/min 1136 l/hr 38 watt-hr 0,061 kg/cm² 2 watt-hr 5,06%
    0,914 m 12,6 l/min 757 l/hr 38 watt-hr 0,091 kg/cm² 2 watt-hr 5,06%

    point 1 is a decision, might be a conclusion, but is not an argument
    point 2 is incorrect: air pumps are not cheaper than submersible pumps
    point 3 (electric safety) is absolutely correct
    point 4 is deceptive: an airlift pump is super simple, designing an energy efficient airlift pump is very complicated
    points 5 to 8 are correct, but there are other solutions to achieve the same
    point 9 is deceptive: compared to what ?
    point 10 may be correct, but only due to extremely poor design of the impellers on centrifugal pumps
    point 11 is incorrect: nearly all centrifugal pumps easily reach 3 bar, which is 30 m head
    point 12 may be correct, compared to other airlift pumps, but at what flow ? Can’t find the data
    point 13 is a slogan
    point 14 is nowhere proven
    point 15 has nothing to do with energy efficiency, so does not prove an airlift pump to be more efficient
    point 16 is acceptable
    point 17 is probably correct, but air pumps also need maintenance
    point 18 is irrelevant, as (in a well designed system), a submersible pump will never run dry either

    conclusion 1: all points mentioned in favor of airlift pumps are sloganesk
    conclusion 2: unless airlift pump manufacturers procure real (measured, not guessed) performance data
    and show these in a regular pump chart, they will never obtain credibility
    conclusion 3: I am not satisfied with only 3,85 to 6.41% energy efficiency
    conclusion 4: the only true arguments remaining for airlift pumps are simplicity and electric safety

    comments, please
    Frank

      • Hi Frank, I have just replied to your further comment via email. As I informed you via private email. as soon as I get a reply from Glenn I will forward the info onto you via private email.

    • Posted by Murray from an email sent by Glenn Martinez and published with his permission.

      Ah, it almost 3am…..I will try to respond to Frank…….

      18 reasons why air lift pumps make so much sense and why you should seriously consider this methodology for your Aquaponics system. (Yes your home Aquaponics system will benefit as well)
      Here is the list. Glenn responds in Blue..

      Frank: Glenn:
      1. No more submersible pumps.

      Okay.. I will restate this….airlifts are viable alternative to submersible pumps….a method to rid ourselves of them or Turbo them for increased performance and head.

      2. Lower install cost….

      It is not just the purchase cost of the pump…it is the cost of installing the GFI or safety outlet and protective float switches to prevent running dry.

      3. No need for additional Earth Leakage Safety cut out switch. (GFI outlet) Higher safety threshold.

      4. So simple even school children can do the install.
      We have school children drilling the pipe and assembling them in competition in minutes. The kids understand WAY faster than adults!

      5. Virtually maintenance free.

      6. No moving parts. K.I.S.S.

      7. Easily pump solids.

      8. Stock separation.

      9. Increase water lift.

      10. Save electrical energy cost.

      11. Go way beyond common lift provided by a regular submersible.

      12. Pump higher than ever before.
      It seems to be is accept fact in literature and practice at colleges that airlifts are only practical for a maximum of 24 inches! We have posted YouTubes of water pumped 24 foot! We do four foot head and pump 1200 gallons er hour with a 60 watt air compressor (Hakko diaphragm)

      13. Turbo drive your water pump.
      Not a slogan….the Turbo is our design of adding air immediately above a submersible pump…..for GREATLY added height, twice what the submersible could do alone. We have posted YouTube videos of this and demonstrated a submersible pump and air lift “Turbo” at Murray’s March one day training. Folks built them and took them home. We pumped 15 o 20 feet high with the “Turbo Submersible/airlift combo”

      14. Turbo drive aeration.
      We use compressed air to lift water up to 25 foot, we have tested the water in the tank (using Nitrogen to drive the Oxygen down to less than 1ppm and run the pump, shooting up 12 to 15 feet and collecting the water in a down pipe, and testing it and having raising the water 2ppm in a single pass. We ran the test for 5 minutes and raised the reading to 7ppm. That was in a 75 gallon tank pumping 400 gallons per hour.

      15. Verticals easily supplied, such as Zip Grow towers or Greenlife Pocket towers. (this feature alone is amazing)

      16. Repair and replacement costs greatly reduced.

      17. Very long service life.
      The intake filter in our airlift compressors are checked every 90 days…..submerged water pumps every day. We have 7 year old air compressors, only rebuilt 3 in the seven years….customers, not ours. Theirs were 2 to 5 years old and fixed for $40. We throw out most submersibles, because the housing the secures the back bearing is worn out. We can replace the front, the impelller and such, but once the housing is good, trash it.

      18. Never run dry.
      No airlift is damaged by running dry not is the pump stained or overheated, it just idles till water returns. No switches or float valves. Air lifts can be dropped into a two inch sump well, hard to get protective switches in a two to four inch well.

      Franks conclusions: Glenn responds in italics...

      conclusion 1: all points mentioned in favor of airlift pumps are sloganesk
      Wow, slogans….just abbreviate text, such as Turbo (see our Patent drawing book) and Never Run Dry…sound like slogan….simple truths.

      conclusion 2: unless airlift pump manufacturers procure real (measured, not guessed) performance data and show these in a regular pump chart, they will never obtain credibility.
      Show me accurate specs on air compressors and water pumps!!! Good luck!! We test most of our pumps by measuring ACTUAL pumping speed by filling a nice gallon bucket and timing it! We test at a minimum 12 inch, 24 inch, 36” and 48” and publish our results and performance. We even post videos on YouTube of us doing the performance tests!
      We would welcome someone funding the testing and documenting the pumps. It takes time and money. We have published many videos of our actual tests

      conclusion 3: I am not satisfied with only 3,85 to 6.41% energy efficiency
      I would like you to share how you come up with these efficiency numbers without running an airlift and measuring it’s performance

      conclusion 4: The only true arguments remaining for airlift pumps are simplicity and electric safety.
      Wow, what happened to picking up solids? no electrical installation costs? added aeration? Only ONE Pump in the system, the airlift pumps the water and provides the aeration! everyone else has TWO pumps, one water, one air for the fish to breathe! Long life? Less wear and tear? Not being outside getting stolen? Salt water and corrosive environments not an issue with PVC airlifts and no moving parts? Never being damaged by running dry? We use airlifts to transport baby shrimp, baby fish and do it without damaging them…..what submersible pump can have life fish or shrimp go thru it? What submersible pump can you pour 1/2 inch rocks and 3 inch leaves thru without damage or concern?

  6. some Belgian guys have developed the most efficient airlift pump I have seen so far:

    • Not bad, seen it before. Glenn Martinez lifts water much higher that that. It is all good. Much still to be discovered I feel.

          • Nobody, the system settings automatically remove URL’s in the header and any URL’s in the text have to be manually approved before published. It is just an anti-spam thing. Sorry about the avatar.

        • Yep, it is not bad, but look closely. They are only sending the water around and around, not actually lifting the water from one tank to another. It is very pretty, nice display.
          Glenn M would refer to that methodology as a “pipe-in-pipe” pump.